NHS practitioners

If you need treatment, it is always worth asking your midwife or GP for a local NHS physiotherapy referral first (as it is free and often nearer to your home). It also raises the profile of the condition and encourages local service provision. It can help to take the national guidelines for PGP and our 'Stickmum' leaflet to show your physiotherapist if they do not offer a full individual assessment and hands-on treatment.

NHS teams our members report providing effective hands-on treatment:

  • Norfolk and Norwich NHS Trust - call their answer phone helpline on: 01603 287130 and leave details of: your full name, date of birth, hospital number – a seven digit number on the top right hand corner of your hospital sticker on your handheld notes, How many weeks pregnant/post-natal you are, contact telephone numbers during working hours, a brief description of the problem.

Private practitioners

The following list is produced from those recommendations where at least two women with PGP have received effective 'hands-on' treatment. However, these practitioners have not been 'vetted' by the Pelvic Partnership. Sometimes after manual treatment, you may feel sore for a day or two, particularly if you have had PGP for some time prior to treatment, but if you are not seeing overall improvements after two to three treatments with any practitioner (including those on this list), you may want to seek another opinion.

We try to ensure that this list is accurate and current, but we cannot guarantee every entry is completely correct when you read it. We rely on you to keep us abreast of current recommendations, so please get in touch with us if you have any relevant feedback on any of these practitioners.

Scotland

Eire/Northern Ireland

North England

  • Ralph Sutton: osteopath (Milnthorpe, Cumbria) 01539 565 777, ralphsuttonosteopaths.co.uk
  • Jen Armitage: physio (Middlesborough) 01642 361166 (works on Fridays)
  • Vicky Smith: physio (Durham) 0191 3830125, 07983 643835, info@tayloredfitphysio.co.uk, tayloredfitphysio.co.uk
  • Lindsey Graham: physio (Sunderland) 0191 5483388, info@sunderlandphysiotherapyclinic.co.uk, sunderlandphysiotherapyclinic.co.uk
  • Sue Francis: physio (Crakehall, Nr Bedale, N. Yorks) 01677 424 088
  • Lynne Midwinter: physio (Todmorden, Lancashire) 01706 819464, lynne@physiotherapies.co.uk, physiotherapies.co.uk
  • Samantha Durnian: physio (Chorley, Lancashire) 01257 230140, info@a6physio.co.uk, a6physio.co.uk
  • Jenny Heron: physio (Horsforth, Leeds) 0113 258 1020, physiofitleeds.co.uk
  • Laetitia Ludovic: chiropractor (Leeds) 0113 228 9888, info@headchiro.com, headchiro.com
  • Cathy Preston and Sarah Joice: physios and colleagues (Leeds, Bradford, Guiseley, Garforth) 0113 287 0926, peakphysiotherapy.com
  • Alison Rose: physio (Leeds) 0113 275 0606, info@cspc.co.uk, cspc.co.uk
  • Ian Horsley: physio (Wakefield) 01924 842 421, backinactionltd.co.uk
  • Lisa Halse: osteopath (Walkley, Sheffield) 0114 234 5459, lodgehouse.org.uk and 0114 258 0133 stillpointpractice.com
  • Helen Harding: chiropractor (Chester, Cheshire) 01244 880186, info@hardingchiropractic.co.uk, hardingchiropractic.co.uk
  • Howard Turner: physio (Wilmslow, Cheshire) 01625 530794, info@wilmslow-physio.co.uk, wilmslow-physio.co.uk
  • Alison Bartup: physio (Bramhall, Stockport) 0161 4408 970
  • Lisa Miller: physio (Prestwich, Manchester) 07806 358752, oakleyphysio.co.uk
  • Deborah Schofield: physio (Rochdale) 07802 517366, mummymassage@hotmail.com, mummymassageandphysio.co.uk
  • Leigh Halfteck: physio (Liverpool and the Wirral) Liverpool clinic: 0151 427 5000, the Wirral clinic: 0151 648 5000, enquiries@chiroandphysio.co.uk, chiroandphysioclinic.co.uk
  • Sally Murray: physio (Burton-on-Trent and Derby) Burton-on-Trent: 01283 563331, appointments@physio-form.co.uk, physio-form.co.uk, Derby: 01332 369713, thesportingjoint.com
  • James Booth: osteopath (Nottingham) 01159 232 425, jamesboothosteopath.co.uk

Central England

South England

West England/Wales

East England

Channel Islands

Cant find a private practitioner in your area?

  • You can try your local sports injury clinic where you can ask to speak to a sports physiotherapist, who ideally specialises in pelvic joint problems, to discuss whether they have relevant experience. They do not have to have specific experience of treating pregnant women. It is most important that they are confident at manually treating the pelvic joints and getting their patients back to playing sport and doing all the normal activities of daily life, rather than just coping with pain and avoiding normal activities. To find a manual or sports physiotherapist in your area visit the Physio First website.
  • You can contact your local osteopath or chiropractor – again, check that they have experience in treating pelvic joint problems. You may find these websites helpful: General Osteopathic Council, British Chiropractic Association and McTimoney Chiropractic Association.

What to expect and check if you are looking for someone to treat your PGP effectively

Here are some questions about what to ask if you call a manual therapist before you go for a consultation:

  • What will you do if I come to see you for my PGP? (You should expect to be asked to undress to your underwear for an assessment and a diagnosis before any treatment starts).
  • Do you treat people with PGP regularly and how many people with PGP have you seen over the last three years?
  • How do you treat it?
  • How soon would you expect to see some improvement, even a little bit?
  • What you should expect from the discussion you have on the phone with a manual therapist ahead of going to see them:

You should be told that the manual therapist intends to examine you, looking for symmetry of movement at the sacroiliac joints and the position of your Symphysis pubis (i.e. not looking for pain at that stage).

  • They should explain what they have found during the assessment and why you have pain
  • They should explain what they are going to do about the pain and how they are going to physically treat you to make you better.
  • They should carry out the treatment. Expect to receive manual treatment not just a list of exercises – exercises tend to work best once you have had some manual therapy and the pain has improved. Manual treatment involves mobilising stiff or ‘stuck’ joints and gently moving your limbs and joints to help realign the pelvis if it is moving asymmetrically.

Please see our 'What to expect from treatment' page for more information.

Last updated 02.07.2018


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Please note, the Pelvic Partnership consists of volunteers who have had Pelvic Girdle Pain and wish to support other women. We aim to pass on information based on research evidence where available. We are not medical professionals and cannot offer medical advice. The Pelvic Partnership takes no responsibility for any action you do or do not take as a result of reading this information.

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